Hi, I'm Quincy Larson, founder of freeCodeCamp, a community where millions of people are learning to code together for free. Ask me anything!

2021-06-17
I'm Quincy Larson, founder of freeCodeCamp. I was a teacher and school director before learning to code in my 30s. In 2014, I launched freeCodeCamp.org, a community of people around the world who learn to code together. As of 2021, half a million people use freeCodeCamp each day, and it has helped thousands of people successfully transition into software development careers. Ask me anything!

Links: freeCodeCamp | Twitter

AMA Rules:
  • This AMA will be open for questions until midnight UTC on 2021-06-17.
  • All plain text links will automatically be turned into hyperlinks.
  • Please keep your questions specific and to the point.
  • Be chill, we're here to have fun!

70 Comments

This AMA has concluded.
waycrofr   Jun 14
The no-code movement is a beautiful project—but those just getting started with coding might (unfairly) compare themselves to airline pilots, who will eventually become obsolete as a result. Although personally I don’t see coding ever really becoming obsolete, I have friends who are just getting started who think certain applications of it (i.e. front end dev) will be eventually replaced and that they shouldnt waste their time.

How would you cool their heads? Did you have any hesitations personally when learning to code in your 30s?
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quincylarson   Jun 15
I promise I'm going to talk about no-code in a moment. And not all my answers are going to be this long :) First I want to point out something that wasn't immediately obvious to me when I asked myself a similar question 10 years ago: won't the job of software developer itself eventually be automated away? Well, software development is the act of automating tasks. So by definition, it will be the last task we fully automate. Software development isn't just a job – it's the last job. Of course, there are a lot of tasks that can't be abstracted enough to be pushed to the software layer. Farming is mostly automated – at least here in the US – and yet we still have millions of farmers. There are aspects of the work that can't be easily handed off to machines yet. Similarly with your example – airline pilots – it's nice to have a human in the loop to make fine-tuning decisions. In the case of a plane filled with several hundred passengers, it's nice to have even two pilots. I don't think this is likely to change in my lifetime. Yes, if you talk to a pilot they will tell you software systems have come a long way. But the cost of having a couple human pilots on a plane, monitoring instrumentation and running through checklists, just making sure everything's OK – that costs a lot less than settling lawsuits with the families of hundreds of people who died in a plane crash due to malfunctioning software. There are relatively few plane crashes each year, and I think it's due to a successful computer-human partnership in terms of helping those humans get to their destination. And thanks to a particularly disciplined culture within the field when it comes to safety, checklists, reporting problems, and doing detailed analysis when something goes wrong. (Yes, there are plenty of high-profile examples that come to mind where planes went catastrophically wrong. But they come to mind because the consequences were so dramatic. And they were newsworthy because they are relatively rare.) OK – so no-code. I have used quite a few no-code tools over the years (and low-code tools) and I think they are a big win for developers. If you want to build a quick prototype, or just get something working quickly, you can grab an off-the-shelf no-code tool. Later – if necessary – you can replace the system you built using that tool with your own custom-coded solution. This will be more flexible and most likely cheaper. No-code and low-code solutions are generally more expensive but they're often worth it thanks to all the time and effort they can save you. A semi-technical founder or project manager may be able to build a prototype to prove out a concept. Some startups that don't want to hire on a ton of developers may even use no-code or low-code tools in production long-term. At the end of the day, these are just tools. And the tools developers use day-to-day generally progress from lower-level-of-abstraction tools (C, SQL) to higher-level-of-abstraction (Python, JavaScript ORMs like Sequalize) to eventually low-code and no-code tools (Zapier, Retool). When you watch Star Trek, and Captain Piccard says: "Computer, analyze the distribution of the pieces that we have, correcting for changes in star configurations over four billion years, then extrapolate for the missing piece." ...is that programming? I would argue that at the end of the day, programming is just figuring out how to tell a machine what to do. And by the 24th century, programming langauges could be so declarative that you may be able to program a computer to do a very complicated and data-intensive task with a single verbal command. Does that make everyone in the Star Trek universe a programmer? Yes. But notice that they still have a huge dedicated engineering team as well. Star Trek may on its face seem like a silly example, but I think it's pretty thoughtful. Since this is TLDR: tl;dr we're going to need software developers for at least the rest of your lifetime, so don't shy away from the field due to concerns about automation. And don't look at low-code / no-code tools as a threat to your livelihood. They are just tools. Learn to use them too.
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ThornishHen   Jun 14
What 'soft' skills (non-technical skills) in your experience are especially valuable for a person changing careers into tech? I am in my mid-40s and switching into software development after two decades of teaching in higher ed.
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wallwalker   Jun 16
Hi, I came from a couple decades in the wine industry to programming. Got into it in my mid-40s too. Your advantage will be your presentation skills, ability to connect with people. My challenge is people at my work don't really volunteer to talk or at least like I was used to in sales. My tips : Know the code but also know the business as in if you work for a bank know a little about how the bank does business.

Get used to the new forms of communication : yes, it's ok to instant message someone right next to you because some times your current task might just flow better that way.

Make sure you get on a Team that can help you grow meaning ideally you want an assigned mentor (your first go to when you are stuck), you want your Team to be comprised of like programmers meaning if you are Java you want at least 3 or 4 other Java folks on your Team.

Ask your hiring manager question like : does your Team have documentation for processes, procedures & the applications you support? Tell me about the on call (Do I have to support the mainframe? If yes, run! ) duties. Will I have an assigned mentor? Will I be able to pair program (I highly recommend this for learning)?

Certain things have to be in place for you to grow quickly (and me being in my mid-40s as well, I don't have time to waste) : mentor, a team you can converse with daily, pair programming, a responsive & positive team leader, documentation, an ability to suck up your ego because it can truly get in your way, be humble but ask questions like your life depends on it. Without these things, you can still grow but not nearly as quickly.
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quincylarson   Jun 16
Communication skills are the real killer app for just about any field – especially fields with tons of details and planning, like software development. Concise emails, clear speech without lots of ums, being able to find good analogies for explaining your thinking and persuading your team mates. And above all else, listening skills. Being able to focus on what people are saying, put yourself in their shoes, and understand not just what they're saying but why they're saying it. There's an old saying that the higher you climb in any organization, the more your job comes to resemble sales. And I believe that is generally true. And what is sales? Communication.
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One   Jun 14
How do you keep yourself from burning out with all these ambitious projects?
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quincylarson   Jun 15
I only work about 6 hours per day, 7 days per week. That only ads up to about 40 hours per week, but the work is more evenly distributed. And I break up my days with a lot of fun activities. I'm learning a lot of music theory and playing bass and drums. And I take my kids to the park every day. So a typical day might be waking up at 10, working for a few hours, then eating lunch with the kids and putting them down for their nap, then working some more, then playing music, then putting them to sleep and finishing working.

I haven't taken a full day off since I started freeCodeCamp, because I want to maintain my momentum. Shawn Wang (Swyx) is a big advocate for the "no zero days" approach to productivity. You win as long as you made some non-zero amount of progress that day with whatever it is you're focused on (in my case, running freeCodeCamp). If you are trying to get into shape, maybe doing at least one set of pushups before bed would be enough to maintain your momentum and have a non-zero day.

When I was younger, I did some interpreting for a physician, and one of the things I noticed about him was that he would see patients even on the weekends, even though he could have just taken it easy. He liked doing it, and it made the rest of his work week less busy. And that was my first exposure to this "no zero days"-like philosophy. And it left a strong impression on me. It may not be for everyone, but it works well for me. That and the healthy diet, exercise, 8 hours of sleep per night – all the stuff everyone else will tell you works – does work. But for me it wasn't quite enough. The "No zero days" approach I learned from that physician was the big breakthrough for me.
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EyeTee   Jun 15
What steps and resources do you recommend to adults who knows 0 code, but want to start learning?
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quincylarson   Jun 16
I recommend that you work through this guide to help you build a strong foundation in programming and computer science. All of these learning resources are free and self-paced. You'll learn basic JavaScript, Python, algorithms, SQL, Linux, and Git: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/coronavirus-academy/
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kdcarlso   Jun 14
I've taken classes on programming from Basic way back in the day to Java and recently Python. I find that the issue isn't knowing commands and syntax but process. What's the best way to learn how to break down a problem and manipulate the data? I just don't seem to be able to break the "basics" barrier. Are there any good books, videos, or courses on the subject?
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quincylarson   Jun 15
You can learn about process from books (like the Pragmatic Programmer book) but imho the best way to really understand the process is to go through it by building and deploying projects, then maintaining those projects. A lot of this will make more sense once you've worked on a software development team for a while. You'll have a lot more context and "war story" narratives in your head to build associations and pattern recognition.

I would focus on building as many projects as you can so you can get a lot of practice, and trying to use those projects (or your best project) to land a job. If you're not in a position to apply for jobs (still a student, or just interested in learning programming for fun) I recommend contributing to open source. It will give you a lot of the same practice and hands-on experience.
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srebalaji   Jun 14
What do you think freeCodeCamp will be in the next 7 to 10 years?
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quincylarson   Jun 15
We will still be a global community of thoughtful people who are learning to code together. But the curriculum will be much more robust. And we'll cover a lot more skills that are useful to 21st century careers, such as advanced mathematics, and computer science / data science / machine learning concepts that have mainly been the tools of a small number of people with Ph.D.s.

Our extra-curricular resources will grow, too. Right now we have about 600 full-length courses on the freeCodeCamp community YouTube channel, and around 7,000 in-depth tutorials on our publication. But that will most likely double or even triple.

And we are working on some other exciting things that should be ready in the coming years as well, and I'm looking forward to announcing them once we have something more concrete to demo. :)
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MathTeacher   Jun 14
Did you ever have doubts while you were creating freeCodeCamp initially? How did you motivate yourself to create a finished product without knowing if people would ever use it?
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quincylarson   Jun 15
I spent a couple years building education tools that nobody was interested, and that I couldn't convince people to use. (They might tell me to my face "oh this is cool" during my user testing, but they would stop logging into to the tool.) With freeCodeCamp, I almost immediately knew something was different, because people were using it and giving me feedback. Not "oh this is cool" feedback but "could you add this feature?" that told me they were intellectually engaging with what I had built. All that stuff about The Lean Startup and Agile Product Management – it works. And ignoring it like I did cost me a couple years. (To be fair, I did become a much better developer during that period, even if nobody used the code I wrote.)

Try to get people to care about your project as quickly as possible. Even one or two people. It will have a huge motivational impact on you. Low fidelity mocks, low-code tools, anything you can use to get an actual project in front of prospective users to get them to care and give feedback.

Once you can get a few people using your project and actually caring about your project, the motivation sort of takes care of itself. "I don't want to let these people down." That is what powers me. Not wanting to let down all the people who depend on freeCodeCamp as a learning resources. It was like that 7 years ago and it's still like that today. Never lose the fear of disappointing people.
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ben   Jun 14
How does FreeCodeCamp decide what tutorials to work on next on your YouTube channel?
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quincylarson   Jun 15
Feedback from comments plays a big part. If you want to see us create a course on a topic we haven't covered (or haven't covered recently) let us know. I spend a lot of time reading YouTube comments, and the comments on the forum and our subreddit.
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aimeri   Jun 14
I used freeCodeCamp to learn web development and transition careers in my mid 30s. At the time I was mostly interested in web development. These days I'm interested in other parts of programming. Does freeCodeCamp have any other fields of programming in mind for the future, other than web development? What about alternative frameworks for web development?
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quincylarson   Jun 16
Our core curriculum focuses on web development, because that's where more than half of all developer jobs are. This said, if you keep going past the front end and back end web development sections, you'll learn scientific computing with Python: data science, machine learning, and a ton of applied mathematics. We're in the process of expanding this into a much larger data science curriculum: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/building-a-data-science-curriculum-with-advanced-math-and-machine-learning/

And we cover tons of other topics, like game development, mobile, embedded systems, and blockchain development through extracurricular courses on freeCodeCamp's YouTube channel. If you really want to learn a topic and we haven't yet covered it in the 600+ full-length YouTube courses on our channel, let me know and I'll investigate it :)
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Phoebe   Jun 14
Why do you think FreeCodeCamp has experienced the success that it has, and what do you think this says about coding education (and education overall) in the future?
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quincylarson   Jun 16
First of all, I don't think there's anything special about myself and my role in freeCodeCamp. I am one of thousands of mid-career people who decided to learn new skills and transition into the field in the early 2010s. I just happened to be in the right place, at the right time, with about $150,000 in savings from my teaching career and side businesses. I was able to self-fund the first few years of building out the freeCodeCamp community and getting tax-exempt nonprofit status.

The fact that I was in San Francisco going to hackathons and talking with tons of other people trying to get in the software development field definitely helped. For example, most university programs were still teaching Java and most coding bootcamps were teaching Ruby, but all the devs I hung out with were switching to Node.js and using it for their hackathon projects, and even building their startups with it.

Also, the critical groundwork of legitimizing online education had already been done by Coursera and EdX. To give you an idea of how crude online ed was before, when I was in college, I took one course where I literally never even heard the professor's voice or saw what he looked like – we just received bulk emails from him each week telling us which chapters to read in the textbook. Online education was but a shadow of what it is today.

So again, right place, right time, gliding in the slipstream that the "big players" had left behind them, leveraging the wisdom of some of the best developers in the world who'd moved to San Francisco from India, China, Brazil... it was a perfect storm of circumstances.

Also, let me point out that I was a 30-something white guy with glasses and a beard. Everyone just assumed I was some life-long programmer, even though I didn't code until age 31. I probably benefitted from a ton of positive stereotypes, and didn't face any of the discrimination that people coming from other backgrounds might have faced.

So what does the success of freeCodeCamp mean for education over all? I think we have proven-out a new approach to community-oriented learning. We've proven that self-motivated adults can learn complicated new skills for free, get jobs, provide for their families, then turn around and create tutorials and courses to help other people do the same.

I don't think freeCodeCamp invalidates high school, college, or trade schools or anything like that. These schools have to teach people who are not super-motivated like most freeCodeCamp learners are. But I do hope that freeCodeCamp inspires these schools to use more community-oriented approaches, more peer learning, and thinking about ways to create interactive, self-paced learning (rather than relying so heavily on Zoom lectures).

And for people who are highly self-motivated, they now have a place they can learn pretty much everything they need to build a career and support their families – all for free and at their own pace. We will continue to expand these learning resources over the coming decades and help more and more people.
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VetTechIT   Jun 16
I am a veterinary surgeon who decided to change her career at 35 doing a master's in computer science. I am a woman, a mum, finished my masters last year and now at 38 want to pursue a career in IT. Is it too late to start again?people around me are not so positive but I tend to keep my head high. And my other question is remote work is impossible for beginners? Thank you.
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aimeri   Jun 16
Don’t let negativity from others stop you. I was on a similar boat, and it is possible. It is not easy, but there are plenty of resources to help you learn, and FCC was an instrumental one for me. As far as getting a remote work as a beginner, that is also possible. My very first job as a developer started in office and even before the pandemic it had transitioned to full remote. After that we hired three more junior developers to join our remote team. This is all to say: both are possible, and while not easy, all it takes is determination and hard work.
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wallwalker   Jun 16
Totally possible. I did it in my mid-40s. It's tough (!!!) but rewarding in so many ways. Every job has its pluses and minuses. Focus on the pluses, deal with the minuses. My questions : do the unsupportive people around you have experience in IT? Are the unsupportive people IT veterans that took a more traditional path into tech like a 4 year degree in CS? If the person doesn't fully understand the current demand in tech (companies are bringing in non-traditional people all the time) and especially the demand for women in tech then I'd just politely give that person a head nod with a smile and take their unsupportive comment straight to the trash can. I came from 20 years in sales, graduated from a bootcamp in my mid-40s and got a job in tech. It wasn't easy and still isn't easy but I'm getting there. Remote is possible. Pre-pandemic I was 40hrs in the cubicle. Now I'm home on Zoom. I'm more focused and love using Zoom to pair program and for meetings. 100% remote work can seem a little isolating because you are not face to face with people but this is tech and my coworkers aren't the social butterflies I was used to while I was in sales 😃. My cats are now my office distractions. Thank goodness they don't keep donuts in the office like my corporate office did.
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quincylarson   Jun 17
Congratulations on successfully transitioning into tech from sales. I think your decades of sales experience will serve you well throughout the rest of your career. You ask a lot of good questions here, and my advice would be to ask the freeCodeCamp community in general. We have an area of our forum dedicated to career questions here: https://forum.freecodecamp.org/c/career/299?order=views
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CMDRArturUSSERRa   Jun 16
You are great! #WonderWoman
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Moag   Jun 14
What is better getting a first job as a front-end developer or a back-end developer ?
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quincylarson   Jun 16
I recommend focusing on front end development first. There are more jobs, and the field is a bit more forgiving in terms of making catastrophic newbie mistakes. You can then learn back end development (both from learning resources and on-the-job) and apply for full stack development jobs (or try to transition within your team). This is why the freeCodeCamp curriculum is structured in the way it is.

Full stack development generally jobs pay better. Though there are a lot of people who just go really deep on front end and make a career for themselves without ever really needing to build APIs or work with databases. Also, regarding the job description of back-end developer – most employers would rather hire full stack developers or hybrid roles like DevOps than dedicated back end developers. Just one of those cost-savings economic realities of most companies. I believe we're heading toward a time when there's less of a distinction between front end, back end, full stack, devops, and we just have "developers" and the expectation is you are a generalist who can flex with the demands of the task at hand. That is how freeCodeCamp's team operates anyway. We're all just devs. :)
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Vaibhavmulti   Jun 14
I have heard freecodecamp(FCC) offers a great web development curriculum. But I am fascinated towards reinforcement learning, drones and artificial intelligence. Does FCC has any curriculum for such or can someone give me a step by step roadmap for the same.
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quincylarson   Jun 15
We will teach reinforcement learning (and other types of machine learning) as part of our big data science curriculum update. We're creating 12 new certifications focused around the Python scientific computing ecosystem, which will include the math you need to be able to understand these systems.
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Salwyn   Jun 16
When will it be out?
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Maria   Jun 14
I love SQL but I don't use it day to day for my job. What types of jobs use SQL on a daily basis?
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Danny   Jun 15
I'm a full stack developer and I use it regularly, but only when inspecting data myself. When writing queries, my company use C# (ASP.NET), so I use something called Entity Framework, which basically means I'm writing code that handles the SQL for me. The most common jobs to use SQL would certainly be back end developers, full stack developers and DBA's. But in our company, even a few of the Project Managers use it, it's a really useful tool for those interested in the data side of things to understand why certain things are happening the way they are.
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nadia   Jun 15
Hi Quincy! I'm curious how you were able to foster community, and how freeCodeCamp's community changed over time either organically or through strategic actions. (At imagiLabs, my team is currently experimenting with how to grow our kid coder base on our free app!)
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quincylarson   Jun 17
Chat rooms were key to our early growth. We used HipChat initially, and now have our own self-hosted chat server based off of the open source RocketChat. Discord is also a good chat tool, though it gives your organization less control. If you are able to have in-person events, those are the most powerful as far as making learners and volunteers feel involved in the process.
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Shivayan   Jun 15
How does a beginner Developer start writing Blog Posts and also grow an audience on Twitter?
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quincylarson   Jun 16
Many good blog posts and books have been written on this. But for actionable advice: take a look at the people I follow on Twitter. Most of them are highly-motivated developers who have powered through the internet's default emotion toward newcomers (apathy) and made a name for themselves through creating learning resources, building cool projects, and inspiring people. I recommend following these people and learning from what they do.
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tldrdan   Jun 14
Hi Quincy,

Thanks for doing this AMA! A few questions: 1) What (if any) metrics/KPIs do you guys track internally to determine if what you're doing is working? 2) Personally building TLDR I have considered adding a forum or a chat room, given that fCC now has both, what would you consider to be the trade offs between the two? 3) What are the best ways to contribute to fCC?

Dan

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quincylarson   Jun 17
Hi Dan, thanks for inviting me to do this AMA. 1. The only metrics we judge ourselves by are A: how much time people spend learning on freeCodeCamp.org (1.3 billion minutes last year) and B: how many people choose to support our nonprofit through monthly donations (currently around 7,000 people) 2. Forums are best for Q+A, chat is best for helping people build immediate friendly connections. We use both, and both are self-hosted. (Though something like Discord could work for chat – you don't get full control over it, but you do get the network effects of being part of a large platform.) 3. If anyone reading this is interested in contributing to our nonprofit's open source project, we could use your help. Code contributions, translations, writing tutorials... here's how to get started: https://contribute.freecodecamp.org/
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jononovo   Jun 14
What was your first course or lesson or feature that exploded with new users? Why? What was the demand on the market and why did FCC's specific first successful lesson solve it?
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CMDRArturUSSERRa   Jun 16
Will PODCASTS come back?
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quincylarson   Jun 17
Not this year, but we haven't ruled out next year yet.
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jwilkins   Jun 15
Hi Quincy! When you were first starting out, did you ever have thoughts about going back to teaching english full time instead of pursuing a brand new unknown path in tech? I have often been conflicted whether to make the career change into tech or stay in my current career where I know I am comfortable and good at it. Thanks!
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quincylarson   Jun 15
A lot of my friends and family thought I was crazy for leaving a "safe" field where I'd already gained a decade of experience. There were definitely times where I doubted myself. And it was brutally hard for me. Even as a white, middle class male with an American passport and a graduate degree, my journey into tech was riddled with ambiguity and doubt. So I can only imagine how daunting this process can be for everyone out there without those significant privileges.

So yes, I thought about abandoning my coding journey constantly. One thing that helped me, though, was that I had learned a foreign language and worked abroad for several years in a different culture. And I kept telling myself – if I can learn to do that, I can learn to code.

If you have something you've accomplished in your life that you're proud of – whether it's learning a musical instrument, winning an athletic competition, or even getting a promotion at work – think back to that and remind yourself that you are a person who may feel doubt, but that you have a proven history of powering through that.

Learning to code is hard, but it is something any sufficiently motivated person can accomplish.

And a bit of a coda – the school I was working for, that all my friends and family were telling me was such a safe career that I should stick with – it went out of business when the pandemic hit. Career safety can be illusory. Keep finding taller mountains to climb.
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jwilkins   Jun 15
Thanks for the reply! It sucks that your previous school went out of business. A lot of music organizations folded because of the pandemic. So I know deep down this change will be for the better. It is just a scary change. Thanks again for your answer!
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mattdavies   Jun 15
Your site seems to be just about web programming and python-based systems. These are skills that would not necessary be useful in systems programming jobs (like video games and embedded programming). Do you have any plans to support systems programming languages such as C++ or Rust?
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quincylarson   Jun 16
freeCodeCamp's core curriculum is indeed focused on web development and scientific computing with Python. Since this is a single, linear curriculum designed for busy adults, we have to keep this focused on tools where most of the jobs are. But we also have over 600 extra-curricular courses on a broad cross-section of tools and concepts, including almost every game development framework, and plenty of C++ courses on the freeCodeCamp community YouTube channel.
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Danny   Jun 15
Hi Quincy, as a developer with a degree and a couple of years experience, I use FCC to freshen up my skills, learn new things and plug gaps in my knowledge. Do you have any plans to support this use case, such as "Fast track" tests that would allow the learner to start at their current knowledge point, and having previous lessons automatically completed (similar to Duolingos "Jump to Checkpoint" tests)? Thanks! <3
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quincylarson   Jun 17
We have considered adding this in since day one, but we've instead decided to just keep our curriculum linear, and allow people to jump to whichever section they feel comfortable with. Quick tests can be deceiving as you never really know the limits of your knowledge until you're working on a real world project, with a lot more context than you can squeeze into a 1 minute multiple choice question.
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STC   Jun 15
I am also curious to hear your thoughts on the increasing popularity of no-code/low-code platforms. In particular, how will this impact programming jobs and jobs in the technological sector in general?
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quincylarson   Jun 17
I wrote a much more comprehensive answer to this up top.
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Holly   Jun 15
Hi Quincy, Can you tell us about coding blockchain. What coding language(s) can create blockchain? How does the blockchain use/connect to the internet? Any other thoughts about blockchain and when will you add a blockchain coding class? Thank you so much! Holly
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quincylarson   Jun 17
Hi Holly, I recommend Googling "Solidity". freeCodeCamp has an in-depth YouTube course that should come up. That is the main language used to do Ethereum development, and that is where I would start. Before you get into blockchain development, I recommend learning programming fundamentals by working through freeCodeCamp's core curriculum for a while.
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Moise   Jun 15
I like programming, but it's hard for me to study it because of my poor English, how can i study even webdegn only? Any advise
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quincylarson   Jun 17
We are translating freeCodeCamp into a number of world languages, and already have it available in Spanish, Italian, and Chinese. If you work through the first certification on freeCodeCamp, you will gain a lot of core web design skills and get familiar with important concepts like accessibility.
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JayVi   Jun 15
Is it possible to learn AI, AR, VR, and XR here without prior knowledge of anything to do with computers?
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quincylarson   Jun 17
There may be some specialized tools or frameworks for learning these, but at some point you will plateau. My advice to everyone is to learn programming and computer science fundamentals. It only takes a few months, and they will make everything else you learn later much, much easier. If you don't know what to do, freeCodeCamp's core curriculum is a good starting point.
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JayVi   Jun 17
Awesome, thank you very much for the helpful information!!
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Itspikapika   Jun 17
How is the dedicated data science curriculum coming up , what would be the key features of that curriculum and how different would it be from the data science and visualization content currently on the free code camp website
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quincylarson   Jun 17
The data science curriculum will make heavy use of the Python tooling ecosystem, and will involve a series of hundreds of Jupyter Notebook-based projects. The old data visualization and data science certifications will remain (we'll convert them into legacy certifications), and replace them with 12 new math and data science focused certifications. These are coming along pretty well, and we may have some of it live by the end of the year.
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Itspikapika   Jun 17
omg i am so excited for it Thank you so much for your precious time to reply love ya sir 💗
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Aditya   Jun 16
Which was your first Programming Language?
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quincylarson   Jun 17
I started with Python, then eventually switched to JavaScript for most day-to-day development. I recommend starting with JavaScript because there are a lot more learning resources for it, and you can easily share your projects with friends and family right in a browser. But Python is also a beginner-friendly scripting language.
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wallwalker   Jun 16
Hi Quincy. freeCodeCamp was one of my top inspirations for getting into tech & I recommend it all the time to folks getting started. Thanks! I'm now a Java programmer with two years experience working for a large financial firm. At the time, Java was the quickest way for me to get a job in tech. Ok so... Java is ok but I love all things front-end : JavaScript, React, CSS, Next.js, Gatsby, etc. My end goal is Web Development, possibly for a small to medium sized marketing firm and eventually working freelance. Could you recommend some type of path for transitioning from something like enterprise Java applications to something more custom like Web Development? Are there UI type opportunities that I should be looking into now while I'm at a big box corp?
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BLCDEV   Jun 16
Please make some great video tutorial series in Blockchain field.
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quincylarson   Jun 17
We have a ton of Blockchain development-focused courses and tutorials. Search YouTube for various languages and frameworks and you should see some freeCodeCamp courses in the search results :)
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Access4All   Jun 16
Hi Quincy, how much FCC is invested in inclusion to all? Does FCC have the resources to insure that the advance math courses and database courses are accessible for blind and dyslexic folks and for all?
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quincylarson   Jun 17
The code editor we use on freeCodeCamp is a modified version of Microsoft's Monaco code editor. Microsoft has been doing some great work in the field of accessibility, and have even hired at least one freeCodeCamp student who is blind to help them further improve these. We make large, legible fonts, color contrast and color-blindness accessibility a priority. If you have suggestions for how we can improve, or how we can make freeCodeCamp more accessible for people with dyslexia, please email me or message me on Twitter.
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akshat   Jun 16
can development be neglected while preparing for in-campus or out-campus placement having full focus on DSA and competitive programming???
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aFriend   Jun 15
Hey!, how are you, how do you feel?
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